His Life in Greece

* After twelve years in Babylon, he returned to his native Samos, well-skilled in all the learning of the Egyptians and the Chaldeans, to commence the fulfillment of the Delphic prediction concerning him. [Bernard H. Springett, Secret Sects of Syria and the Lebanon, Chapter XI: Pythagoras and His System, pp. 98-106]

* After leaving Babylon, Pythagoras visited the oracles, worshiping particularly at the bloodless shrine of Apollo at Delos. Here wheat, barley and cakes were the sacrifices offered… Diogenes is the authority for the statement that Pythagoras went also into Arabia in his thorough search for knowledge. He went next to Crete and Sparta, to acquaint himself with the laws of Minos and Lycurgus. The following tradition is connected with Crete. Here Pythagoras was said to have been purified by Cerannian stone – part of a thunderbolt of Jupiter. He also applied himself to the Cretan Epimenide, and went with him into the Idaean Cave (where Jupiter was said to have been buried), wrapped in wool, for three times nine days. A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 29-30]

* Mr. Leadbetter is the authority for the statement that Pythagoras traveled to Brittany and there studied under the Druid priests…. A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 30]

* Pythagoras, having been redeemed by Gyllus, Prince of Crotona, … was then about fifty-six years of age. A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 31]

* His greater mission was to rouse to life the slumbering soul of the gods in the sanctuaries; to bring forth a philosophy which was to lay the foundations of the future scientific thought of Europe and the whole world; to found a school of life whence should come forth, not politicians and sophists but men and women, true mothers and true heroes. [A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 18]

* Pythagoras visited all the temples of Greece, being everywhere received as a master; [Bernard H. Springett, Secret Sects of Syria and the Lebanon, Chapter XI: Pythagoras and His System, pp. 98-106]

* He originated the word “philosopher.” Being demanded what his appellation was, he answered that he was not Sophos, wise, but Philosophos, a lover of wisdom. Heraclides states it thus, as in a discourse with Leo: “He went to Phlius and discoursed upon some things learned and copiously with Leo, Prince of Phliasians, and Leo, admiring his wit and eloquence, demanded in what art he most confided. He answered that he knew no art, but was a philosopher. Leo, wondering at the novelty of the name, asked who were philosophers and what difference there was between them and others. Pythagoras answered…. But there are certain persons, and those of the better quality, who seek neither applause nor gain, but come to behold and curiously observe what is done and how…. These are called inquirers after wisdom; these are philosophers. Thus, whereas learning before was called Sophia, wisdom, and the professors thereof Sophoi, Pythagoras, by a more modest appellation, named it philosophy, love of wisdom, and its professors philosophers; conceiving the attribute of “wise” not to belong to men, “but to God only.” [A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 16-17]

* It became the purpose of the Great Ones to popularize esoteric teachings and Pythagoras was sent to become the Master of lay Greece as Orpheus had been the Master of sacerdotal Greece. His influence was shown in poetry, games and gymnastic contests. Schure says: “Olympic games were a project of the Masters to draw together and unite the twelve tribes of Greece”; that “the Amphictyonic Court was a supreme assembly of Initiates.” Pythagoras’ influence reached through three centuries of artistic creation and intellectual splendor before the ascendency of Macedonia and Rome. His mission was to coordinate the thought of Orpheus into a system, with scientific and moral proof suited to the new times. Schure calls “Orpheus the Initiate of the dawn of Greece, Pythagoras of the full daylight and Plato of the setting sun”; he says also, “Pythagoras, the torch bearer, follows the great hierophant of the Mysteries of Eleusis.” [A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 17-18]

* Presided over the Mysteries of Eleusis where hierophant had given up his place to him. [Edouard Schure, Pythagoras and the Delphic Mysteries, p. ]

* Then he reached Delphi, that great center of clairvoyant divination, practiced there, as in the Egyptian temples, as an art and a science, but only to be used by the loftiest minds, and by them with a degree of religious sincerity and scientific thoroughness which raised it to the height of a real ministration. [Bernard H. Springett, Secret Sects of Syria and the Lebanon, Chapter XI: Pythagoras and His System, pp. 98-106]

* Pythagoras initiated the Young Theoclea into the secret teachings and prepared her for her mission, the Pythoness of Delphi. She had been accepted into the college of priestesses of Apollo because of her hereditary lineage. It was Pythagoras who recognized her gift of sight. Theoclea could see white forms gliding by, heard voices in open daylight. Upon exposing herself to the sun, their vibration threw her into a kind of ecstasy during which she heard the singing of invisible choirs. It was said that when Pythagoras and Theoclea first met, there was an instant recognition and understanding. [Edouard Schure, Pythagoras and the Delphic Mysteries, p. ]

* In conjunction with Theoclea, Pythagoras instilled at Delphi a strengthening infusion of his own Egyptian and Chaldean knowledge, and once again Delphi became a center of life and action. [Bernard H. Springett, Secret Sects of Syria and the Lebanon, Chapter XI: Pythagoras and His System, pp. 98-106]

* Theoclea while in a trance tells Pythagoras “bear the torch of light into Italy (Greater Greece).” [Edouard Schure, Pythagoras and the Delphic Mysteries, p. ]

* After much effort in his own country to teach his philosophy, Pythagoras found that the symbolic mode did not appeal to the Samians and no one wished to persist in the studies. He succeeded in attaching to himself only one follower, a boy who was devoted to athletic sports but had not the means to pursue them…. Pythagoras formed each of his arithmetical and geometrical demonstrations into an abacus and gave him three oboli for each figure which he learned… Thus the boy proved true and continued with his studies and was the only Samian who migrated with Pythagoras to Crotona. This youth bore also the name, “Pythagoras,” it being often the custom for excellent pupils to bear the name of their masters. [A Group of Students, Pythagoras: Greek Philosopher, Initiate Teacher, Founder of A Brotherhood at Crotona, p. 31-32] – Editor’s Note: The Samian Pythagoras may be the “Pythagoras” buried at the gravesite in Kerameikos. Although it has been noted that the person buried is from Selymbria and not of Samian origin.